What to Plant in February: Vegetable Growing Guides

Learn what to plant in February with Homesteaders of America Vegetable Garden Growing Guides!

While most of the gardens in the United States are still resting, perhaps even insulated under a thick blanket of snow, there are a few southern areas beginning to warm up and will be ready to grow vegetables soon!

What to Plant in February: Vegetable Garden Growing Guide

How to Use the Growing Guides

In the Growing Guides, you will learn what to plant each month according to when your last frost date. 

The Growing Guides will be targeted for the continental United States, which also includes some of the warmer areas of our country such as southern extremes Texas and Florida. Though we may be buried in snow folks, in February it’s time for folks in the deep south to get growing!

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What to Plant in February: Vegetable Growing Guide

Last Frost Date in January

While most of your garden is in and the growing season is well underway, you can maximize your growing efforts through succession planting! Early crops or quick growing ones will be ready to go into the ground again so you can make good use of your garden space and harvest even more.

Direct Seed

  • Radishes
  • Lettuce
  • Greens
  • Green Beans
  • Carrots, depending on variety

Start Indoors

For succession planting next month plant these indoors:

  • Summer Squash
  • Cucumbers

Last Frost Date in February

Even though a huge portion of the United States was hit by a snowstorm last week, a few extreme southern regions of the United States are warm enough to start their growing season!

If your last frost date is this month, your garden may already be well on its way with plants that can tolerate more chilly weather. February is the time for you to plant all of your direct started seeds in the ground. Tender seedlings can be transplanted now as well!

Start Indoors

  • Nothing here! It’s time to move the sowing outdoors!

Direct Seed

  • Beans
  • Beets
  • Carrots
  • Corn
  • Cucumbers
  • Kale
  • Squash
  • Melons
  • Sweet Potatoes
  • Warm Weather Herbs, such as Basil, Chamomile, Nasturtiums and more

Transplant

  • Brassicas, if not done already
  • Eggplant
  • Onions, if not done already
  • Peppers
  • Tomatoes
  • Herb Seedlings

Last Frost Date in March

If your last frost date will be in March, there is much that can be done in the garden already! Once your soil is able to be worked you can get many cold hardy vegetables in the ground a month before your last frost.

Start Indoors

  • Want a second (or third) succession of greens? Start a round of lettuce indoors to transplant next month.
  • Brassicas

Direct Seed

  • Lettuce
  • Peas
  • Potatoes
  • Radishes
  • Spinach
  • Kale
  • Swiss Chard
  • Turnips

Transplant

  • Brassicas
  • Onions
  • Lettuce
  • Spinach
  • Cold Tolerant Herbs, such as Fennel

Last Frost Date in April

Last frost date in April? It won’t be long now! And thankfully, there is still much gardening that can be done even though the weather in your neck of the woods is still pretty chilly.

Start Indoors

  • Lettuce
  • Spinach
  • Kale
  • Swiss Chard
  • Onions, if not done already
  • Peppers
  • Tomatoes
  • Eggplant
  • Slow-Growing Herbs (see seed packets for details)

Direct Seed

  • It may be possible for you to plant peas.

Transplant

  • It’s still too cold to plant anything directly in the soil without using season extension though by the end of the month you may be able to transplant onion seedlings or sets.

Last Frost Date in May

A large portion of the United States has their last frost date in May. If you’re one of these folks it’s still to early to get out and work in the garden, but there is plenty to do indoors!

Start Indoors

  • Onions
  • Peppers
  • Tomatoes
  • Slow-Growing Herbs (see seed packets for details)

Last Frost Date in June

Still plenty of time for folks with a last frost date in June before you’re going to get busy in the garden. Make sure your indoor seed starting area is ready, your grow light bulbs aren’t burned out, find your timer, and get potting soil on hand because next month…. you get to crack a packet of seeds!